What type of RV should I buy?

 

Choosing an RV that is right for your family, can be a difficult decisions… many factors should be considered before making a purchase. So what type of RV should I buy? There are many types of RVs to choose from…the options are quite numerous and the choice is quite personal. The basic categories of RVs are:

  • Truck Campers
  • Travel Trailers
  • Fifth Wheels
  • Motor-homes (Class A, Class C, & Class B)

PROS & CONS OF EACH

Truck Campers – an RV that may be carried in the bed of a pickup truck.

Pros: 

  • One of the least expensive RV’s.
  • Mounts in the bed of most full size trucks with minimal modifications.
  • Truck doubles as local transportation.
  • Can tow a small trailer or support a carrying platform on hitch.
  • Requires no special storage when not in use. Fits in standard driveway or back yard.
  • Can reach less accessible camping sites that are too tight for large RV’s. When attached to an off-road truck, it can reach camping sites that no other RV’s can.

Cons: 

  • Driving and living compartments are separate. Living area inaccessible while moving.
  • Road handling can be an issue when mounted on a truck with light suspension.
  • Limited space practical only for short trips.

   Travel Trailers–  are trailers that are hitch and towed completely behind a tow vehicle.

Pros: 

  • Can be towed with a variety of vehicles fitted with a standard ball hitch and rated for the trailer weight.
  • Spacious, open floor plans suitable for a variety of uses.
  • Provides more interior space per length foot than motor homes because it does not contain driving and engine compartments.
  • Lower profile allows easier entry than a fifth wheel trailer.
  • Tow vehicle doubles as local transportation.

Cons:

  • Less storage than fifth wheel trailers because it lacks a raised section.
  • Least stable on the road of all RV types. Requires the most skill to tow and back up.
  • Driving and living compartments are separate. Living area inaccessible while moving.
  • Generally cannot tow vehicle behind trailer.
  • Larger models require large storage area when not in use.

Fifth Wheels trailers that have a goose-neck front section that extends over the bed of the pick-up truck.

Pros:

  • Easier and safer to tow than travel trailers, but requires more caution and skill than motor homes.
  • Easier to back up than travel trailers.
  • Spacious, open floor plans suitable for full-timers.
  • Provides more interior space per length foot than motor homes because it does not contain driving and engine compartments.
  • Most storage space of all trailer type RV’s.
  • Tow vehicle doubles as local transportation.

Cons:

  • Requires a truck with fifth wheel hitch in bed.
  • Driving and living compartments are separate. Living area inaccessible while moving.
  • Generally cannot tow vehicle behind trailer.
  • On tall models top clearance can be a problem under low branches and structures.
  • Most models require large storage area when not in use.

Motor homes -Motor homes are RVs with your vehicle and living quarters combined. There are 3 different classes of motor homes; Class A, Class B, & Class C. Here is the pros & cons for each:

Class A- Class A motor homes are the largest. They are the RVs most people think of when you use the term RV.

Pros:

  • Easy to drive on highway.
  • Spacious, open floor plans suitable for full-timers.
  • Elevated driver position provides a good view of the road ahead.
  • Driving and living compartments are connected. Living area accessible even while moving (not recommended).
  • Most storage space of all RV types.
  • Can tow vehicle behind or support a carrying platform on hitch.

Cons:

  • Most expensive of all RV types.
  • Can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces.
  • Most are too large to drive around town; alternate local transportation required.
  • Top clearance can be a problem under low branches and structures.
  • Requires large storage area when not in use.

Class B– Class B motorhomes are the smallest and are built on a van chassis. Although there are full-timers in Class Bs, they are generally too small to live in for long periods of time.

Pros:

  • Least expensive motorized RV to own and operate.
  • Easy to drive on highway and around town.
  • Driving and living compartments are connected. Living area accessible even while moving (not recommended).
  • It can be used as local transportation.
  • Can tow a small trailer or support a carrying platform on hitch.
  • Can be used as a second family car when not traveling.
  • Requires no special storage when not in use. Fits in standard driveway and lower models may fit in the garage.
  • Can reach less accessible camping sites that are too tight for large RV’s.

Cons:

  • Limited space practical only for short trips.

Class C– Class C motorhomes are built on a van chassis and are often referred to as mini-motorhomes. They are distinguished by an extended section over the cab which usually contains an extra bed.

Pros:

  • Easy to drive.
  • Driving and living compartments are connected. Living area accessible even while moving (not recommended).
  • Can tow vehicle behind or support a carrying platform on hitch.
  • Smaller windshield and curtain separating cockpit makes unit easier to heat and cool than a Class A.

Cons:

  • Largest models can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces.
  • Some models may be too large to drive around town; alternate local transportation may be required.
  • Requires large storage area when not in use.

 

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